Obama Frees USS Cole Bombing Terrorist

On Thursday morning, sailors on board the USS Cole were lining up for an early lunch. Seventeen of them died as an Al Qaeda bomb on board a fishing boat tore through the hull outside the galley. The dead included 15 men and 2 women, one of whom had a young child. For three weeks the crew of the USS Cole struggled to keep their ship from sinking while working waist deep in water with bucket brigades, sleeping on the deck and living surrounded by the terrible aftermath of the terrorist attack.

The survivors, wounded and whole, received the words “Glory is the Reward of Valor” written on the bent steel removed from the site of the explosion that tore through their ship and their lives.

The President of the United States promised that justice would be done. “To those who attacked them we say: You will not find a safe harbor. We will find you and justice will prevail.”

Despite Clinton’s words, justice did not prevail.

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Gitmo’s Worst Terrorists Skype as Part of “Humane Treatment”

Judicial Watch

In the latest of many fringe benefits extended to the world’s most dangerous terrorists the Obama administration is allowing Guantanamo Bay prisoners—including a senior Al Qaeda operative—to speak with family via video chats similar to Skype.

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The captives are “high-value” detainees locked up in a special top-security wing of the military compound at the U.S. Naval base in southeast Cuba. Two of the terrorists recently had video conferences with family for the first time since their incarceration, according to a Spanish news agency that identifies them as Abu Faraj al Libi and Abd al Rahim al Nashiri. Al Libi was the former No. 3 Al Qaeda leader, captured in 2005. His Department of Defense file says he’s a high risk prisoner of high intelligence value who served as the operational chief of Al Qaeda and had long term associations with Osama bin Laden.

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Obama Halts Prosecution of U.S.S. Cole Bomber

Fox Nation

The Obama administration has shelved the planned prosecution of Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the alleged coordinator of the Oct. 2000 suicide attack on the USS Cole in Yemen, according to a court filing.

The decision at least temporarily scuttles what was supposed to be the signature trial of a major al-Qaeda figure under a reformed system of military commissions. And it comes practically on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the attack, which killed 17 sailors and wounded dozens when a boat packed with explosives ripped a hole in the side of the warship in the port of Aden.

In a filing this week in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, the Justice Department said that “no charges are either pending or contemplated with respect to al-Nashiri in the near future.”

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