State of the Union: Obama ‘disses’ fallen cop heroes while honoring lawbreaker

Family Security Matters

While past presidents have always invited special guests to sit with their spouses during the annual State of the Union address to the nation, historians have pointed out they usually invited those who either achieved an act of bravery or contributed to the betterment of the United States. However, President Barack Obama is known for inviting guests to sit with First Lady Michelle Obama to illustrated what he believes are his achievements and his contributions. Such was the case with Obama’s special guest on Tuesday night, someone who according to U.S. law is in the United States illegally, college student Ana Zamora.

Several law enforcement officers were angry over Obama’s failure to include at least one family member who lost a military or law enforcement serving husband or son such as the two NYPD officers, Det. Rafael Ramos and Det. Wenjian Liu assassinated by a black, Islamist named Ismaaiyl Abdullah-Muhammad Brinsley. In fact, there were no widows or fatherless/motherless children of soldiers or cops seen with the First Lady, according to former police officer Iris Aquino. “Why would Obama invite them? After all, he and his Attorney General have shown repeatedly their dislike for cops,” the Hispanic cop said.

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Obama threatens vetoes of bills requiring him to follow the law

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Washington Examiner

President Obama is threatening to veto a law that would allow Congress to sue him in federal courts for arbitrarily changing or refusing to enforce federal laws because it “violates the separation of powers” by encroaching on his presidential authority.

“[T]he power the bill purports to assign to Congress to sue the President over whether he has properly discharged his constitutional obligation to take care that the laws be faithfully executed exceeds constitutional limitations,” the White House Office of Management and Budget said Wednesday in a statement of administration policy. “Congress may not assign such power to itself, nor may it assign to the courts the task of resolving such generalized political disputes.”

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