If Benghazi doesn’t matter, what does?

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Family Security Matters

by DR. ROBIN MCFEE

 

For me, these names matter: Christopher Stevens, US Ambassador to Libya, Sean Smith, career diplomat, Glen Doherty,   former Navy Seal, and Tyrone Woods, former Navy Seal.  All died in the service of the United States. They left behind loved ones who are owed the truth, and the sincere support of a grateful nation. But are we grateful?

In the last few days much of what I have heard has been disgusting. Comments like “it’s over” or “it is merely a partisan ploy to keep Hillary from the White House” or “mistakes happen in war, let’s move on.”

I’m not sure what makes me sicker; the notion that Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama allowed to die a US ambassador and brave Americans trying to protect him. Or the notion that both of them, Hillary especially, tried to cover up the mistakes, and activities that allowed Americans to be slaughtered, just to protect their campaigns, and legacy. Or the recognition my fellow citizens and much of the media are willingly providing political cover, excuses and support for Hillary Clinton – just so their candidate can win the presidency.

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Pressure Builds on Boehner Over Benghazi

Family Security Matters

Informed speculation mounted at Monday’s Accuracy in Media conference, which  officially launched the Citizens’  Commission on Benghazi, that House Speaker John Boehner’s opposition to a  Watergate-style congressional committee to investigate Benghazi stems from his  knowledge of arms shipments to al-Qaeda terrorists in Libya and Syria.

The al-Qaeda terrorist attack on the American diplomatic mission at Benghazi, in Libya, on September 11, 2012,  resulted in the deaths of four Americans, who were left to die, rather than be  rescued, and has been called by some the “Benghazi Betrayal.”

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Benghazi: One Year Later

Family Security Matters

Twelve years ago the bloodiest terrorist attack ever on U.S. soil occurred.  But, last year, the American people received another mournful September 11th  tragedy.

One year ago today, the victims of the Benghazi, Libya attacks-Ambassador  Chris Stevens, Sean Smith, Glen Doherty, and Tyrone Woods-lost their lives at  the Special Mission Compound and CIA Annex in Benghazi. Others were seriously  injured. Since then, no one has been held accountable for the inadequate  security at the Mission, which ignored the so-called Inman  standards, or for the failure to fully anticipate the attacks given Libya’s  deteriorating security environment. This in spite of numerous  requests for increased security, which were ignored by top officials in  Washington, D.C. Danger pay was increased for those in Benghazi, but the  security was not upgraded. “The takeaway from that, for me and my staff, it was  abundantly clear, we were not going to get resources until the aftermath of an  incident,” said Eric Nordstrom, former Regional Security Officer in Tripoli, at  a November 2012 hearing. “And the question that we would ask is, again, how thin  does the ice have to get before someone falls through?”

Last month, the American people were treated to the news that Secretary of  State John Kerry had cleared the State Department officials that former  Secretary of State Clinton had placed on administrative leave for their failure  to take appropriate action in the lead-up to the Benghazi attack. In December,  2012, The Accountability Review Board “found that certain senior State  Department officials within two bureaus demonstrated a lack of proactive  leadership and management ability in their responses to security  concerns…given the deteriorating threat environment and the lack of reliable  host government protection.” “However, the Board did not find reasonable cause  to determine that any individual U.S. government employee breached his or her  duty.” It was this lack of “breached” duty that compelled Secretary Kerry to end  the administrative leave for these officials and return them to State, albeit  into different positions.

Who, then, will be held accountable for the Administration’s failures in  Benghazi?

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