Air Force general who warned of ‘treason’ for A-10 comments is removed


Free Republic

Maj. Gen. James N. Post was speaking to a group of about 300 airmen at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada in January when he began to talk about the ongoing budget battle in Congress and how the Air Force would need to divest the A-10 in order to move forward on some of its other airframes. (U.S Air Force)

The Air Force commander who warned fellow airmen that speaking positively of the A-10s performance to members of Congress could be considered “treason” has been removed from office, the Air Force announced Friday.

Maj. Gen. James N. Post was speaking to a group of about 300 airmen at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada in January when he began to talk about the ongoing budget battle in Congress and how the Air Force would need to divest the A-10 in order to move forward on some of its other airframes.

“In the course of his remarks [Post] discussed the importance of loyalty to senior leader decisions [on the A-10] and used the word “treason” in describing his thoughts on communication by airmen counter to those decisions,” the Air Force said in a statement released Friday.

In the prepared statement, Post offered his apologies for the incident.

“My impromptu remarks at the January Weapons and Tactics conference regarding the future of the A-10 have regrettably sparked a lot of controversy and attention. I hope my departure from ACC will enable the command to refocus on the mission as soon as possible.”

After an investigation by the Air Force inspector general it was determined that Post’s comments had a “chilling effect on some of the attendees and caused them to feel constrained from communicating with members of Congress,” the Air Force said.

The Air Force has been criticized over the last few months in its handling of the A-10 in its quest to divest the close air support airframe, particularly in how it has previously reported the attack aircraft’s role in combat compared to the Air Force’s other bombers and attack planes.

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command where Post was assigned, issued a letter of reprimand and had Post moved from his position as vice commander at the command.

It was not immediately clear where Post was moved to.