CNN: Obama doesn’t get to 50% approval … on anything

Hot Air

That analysis comes from CNN’s John King, who notes that Barack Obama has had some, er, problems connecting with the public in his second term. In the poll released yesterday, CNN asked respondents for opinions on twelve issues, and Obama didn’t get to 50% on a single one — but had majority disapproval for all but two:

In fact, his overall approval rating in the CNN series has barely budged from the announcement over a year ago that the IRS had targeted Obama’s political opponents in Tea Party organizations. It’s also about the same time that whistleblowers emerged to dispute the White House/State Department narrative on Benghazi, too. At that point, CNN had Obama’s job approval rating at 53/45, roughly where it had been since his re-election. It hasn’t been above 45% since.

Only on environmental policy did Obama register a positive reaction, but it’s mighty thin at 49/45. He scored 49/49 on terrorism, but most of the poll was conducted before Americans found out that Obama released five of the most dangerous Taliban figures from Guantanamo Bay — and did so illegally. Don’t expect that number to remain balanced for long, in other words. On issues closer to the midterm focus, Obama performs abysmally:

  • Economy – 38/61, down from 43/56 in September
  • Health care – 36/63, was 42/55
  • Foreign affairs – 40/57, same
  • Helping the middle class – 40/58, was not asked in September
  • The VA – 37/58 (new)
  • Ukraine – 38/53 (new)

The economy will be the real danger area for Democrats in the midterms, especially those running in red and purple states, and so will health care. Those are the top two issues respondents named for the most important issue in the country, 40% and 19% respectively — and they used to be Democratic Party strengths. The White House wants to talk about the environment and immigration, but neither of them even reach double digits on the priority list CNN gets from its survey.

This is the price of incompetence, and this was before the Bergdahl disaster. It’s left the White House and its Democrat allies no room to pivot anywhere. As King and his panel conclude, it’s not so much disagreement on the issues as it is a vote of no confidence in the man who’s implementing them.

 

Obama is Nobody’s Messiah Now

CBS POLL SHOWS ABYSMAL RESULTS FOR THE CANDIDATE OF “HOPE AND CHANGE”

The Post & E-Mail

by JB Williams, © 2010

(Feb. 20, 2010) — CBS News ran an internal internet poll asking Americans to grade the Obama administration on performance in the key areas of federal government. CBS didn’t dare report on those findings, but as of this writing, you can still vote in the CBS poll and see the staggering results here.

The results are currently as follows:

• Economy – 70.4% – F
• Foreign Policy – 61.8% – F
• Health Care – 81.6% – F
• Terror Threat – 65.2% F
• Energy & Environment – 59.2% – F
• Social Issues – 57.7% – F
• Bipartisanship – 80.6% – F
• Afghanistan – 83.1% C or lower – 31.2% – F
• Iraq – 86.5% C or lower – 35.7% F
• Obama Overall – 89.4% D or lower – 63.4% F

Only 2.82% of CBS fans gave Obama an “A” for overall job performance, and CBS is no bastion of conservative readers.

In November 2008, approximately 52% of American voters elected Obama as President. On Inauguration Day 2009, 67% of Americans said they were hopeful about the new “messiah,” with 41% showing “strong support” for the newly-elected resident of the people’s White House.

Thirteen months later, only 23% “strongly approve” and 40% now “strongly disapprove” of the Obama administration, according to Rasmussen Daily Tracking poll, which appears much kinder towards Obama than the CBS News poll that even CBS won’t write about.

No American administration in U.S. history has fallen from favor so fast…

Complete Story:

75% Are Angry At Government’s Current Policies

Rasmussen

Voters are madder than ever at the current policies of the federal government.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 75% of likely voters now say they are at least somewhat angry at the government’s current policies, up four points from late November and up nine points since September. The overall figures include 45% who are Very Angry, also a nine-point increase since September.

Just 19% now say they’re not very or not at all angry at the government’s policies, down eight points from the previous survey and down 11 from September. That 19% includes only eight percent (8%) who say they’re not angry at all and 11% who are not very angry.

Part of the frustration is likely due to the belief of 60% of voters that neither Republican political leaders nor Democratic political leaders have a good understanding of what is needed today. That finding is identical to the view last September, just after the tumultuous congressional town hall meetings the month before. But only 52% felt this way in November.

Americans are united in the belief “that the political system is broken, that most politicians are corrupt, and that neither major political party has the answers,” Scott Rasmussen explains in his new book, In Search of Self-Governance.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

Male voters are definitely angrier than women. Voters earning $60,000 to $100,000 per year are more frustrated than those in any other income group.

Eighty-nine percent (89%) of Republicans are angry with the government’s current policies, which is perhaps not surprising with the White House and Congress both in Democratic hands. But 78% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree.

Sixty-one percent (61%) of Democrats share that anger, but Republicans are three times as likely as Democrats to be Very Angry.

The divide between the Political Class and Mainstream voters, however, is remarkable. Eighty-eight percent (88%) of Mainstream voters are angry, but 84% of the Political Class are not. Those numbers include 57% of Mainstream voters who are Very Angry and 51% of the Political Class who are not angry at all.

But then 68% of Mainstream voters don’t think the leaders of either major political party have a good understanding of what the country needs today. Sixty-one percent (61%) of the Political Class disagree.

By comparison, the majority of Republicans, Democrats and unaffiliateds don’t believe the current political leaders have a good handle on what is needed today.

Older voters and higher-income voters share that belief most strongly.

Democratic Senate candidates are struggling in a number of states in part because of unhappiness with the government’s policies, including the controversial national health care plan. Opposition to that plan played a key part in the GOP upset Senate win last month in Massachusetts.

Most voters oppose the now-seemingly-derailed health care plan proposed by President Obama and congressional Democrats for months. They continue to have very mixed feelings about the $787-billion economic stimulus plan approved by Congress last February.

Looking back, most voters still don’t approve of the multi-billion-dollar government bailouts of the financial industry and troubled automakers General Motors and Chrysler.

Forty-nine percent (49%) worry the government will try to do too much to help the economy, while 39% fear it won’t do enough.

As the economy continues to stumble along, 59% of voters believe cutting taxes is better than increasing government spending as a job-creation tool, but 72% expect the nation’s elected politicians to increase spending instead.

Eighty-three percent (83%) of Americans say the size of the federal budget deficit is due more to the unwillingness of politicians to cut government spending than to the reluctance of taxpayers to pay more in taxes.

Voters have consistently said for months that they have more confidence in their own economic judgment than that of either the president or Congress.

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