3 Out of 4 Convicted Terrorists Came to U.S. Legally Via Current Immigration System

Illustrating the national security threats created by the nation’s immigration system, the overwhelming majority of individuals convicted of terrorism are foreigners who entered the United States legally through various federal programs. Three out of every four convicted terrorists between September 11, 2001 and December 31, 2016 are foreign born and came to the United States through our immigration system, according to a new report issued jointly by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ).

At least 549 individuals were convicted of terrorism-related charges in American federal courts since 2001 and 402 of them-approximately 73%-were foreign-born, the report says. Here’s the breakdown by citizenship at the time of their convictions; 254 were not U.S. citizens, 148 were naturalized and received American citizenship and 147 were U.S. born. Additionally, 1,716 foreigners with national security concerns were removed from the United States. The Trump administration stresses that figures include only those aliens who were convicted or removed and therefore do not represent the total measure of foreign terrorist infiltration of the United States. Statistics on individuals facing terrorism charges who have not yet been convicted will be provided in follow-up reports that will be made available to the public.

This DHS/DOJ report, issued this month, is disturbing enough and reveals that a significant number of terrorists entered the country through immigration programs that use family ties and extended-family chain migration as a basis for entry. Among them is Mufid Elfgeeh, a national of Yemen who benefitted from chain migration in 1997 and was sentenced to more than 22 years in prison for attempting to recruit fighters for ISIS. Sudanese Mahmoud Amin Mohamed Elhassan came to the U.S. in 2012 as a relative of a lawful permanent resident and eventually pleaded guilty to attempting to provide material support to ISIS. Pakistani Uzair Paracha was admitted to the U.S. in 1980 as a family member of a lawful permanent resident and in 2006 was sentenced to more than three decades in prison for providing material support to Al Qaeda. Khaleel Ahmed, a national of India, was admitted to the United States in 1998 as a family member of a naturalized United States citizen. Ahmed eventually became an American citizen and in 2010 was sentenced to more than eight years in prison for conspiring to provide material support to terrorists.

Other convicted terrorists came to the U.S. through the controversial visa lottery program, the multi-agency probe found. Among them is Abdurasaul Hasanovich Juraboev, a national of Uzbekistan who was admitted into the country as a diversity visa lottery recipient in 2011. In 2015, he pleaded guilty to conspiring to support ISIS and in 2017 Juraboev was sentenced to 15 years in prison. Sudanese Ali Shukri Amin was admitted to the U.S. in 1999 as the child of a diversity visa lottery recipient and subsequently obtained American citizenship through naturalization. In 2015, he was sentenced to more than 11 years in prison for conspiring to provide material support and resources to ISIS. Amin admitted to using social media to provide advice and encouragement to ISIS and its supporters and facilitated ISIS supporters seeking to travel to Syria to join the terrorist group. Amin also helped a Virginia teen named Reza Niknejad get to Syria to join ISIS in 2015.

“The United States faces a serious and persistent terror threat, and individuals with ties to terror can and will use any pathway to enter our country,” the new DHS/DOJ report states. “Accordingly, DHS has taken significant steps to improve the security of all potential routes used by known or suspected terrorists (KST) to travel to the United States to ensure that individuals who would do harm to Americans are identified and detected, and their plots are disrupted. These figures reflect the challenges faced by the United States and demonstrate the necessity to remain vigilant and proactive in our counterterrorism posture.”

National Security Threats Brought Into Focus

 

Family Security Matters

“[President Barack Obama] came into office believing that through the power of his personality, and the belief that if America changed its behavior, everything would be okay-that the problem was not the ideology of radical jihadists, the problem was America,” said former Congressman Pete Hoekstra.

On September 29th, I attended an EMPact America conference about the dangers a weakened America poses to the world, the necessity for a stronger military in the face of worldwide threats, and how America has switched sides in the War on Terror. It was a sobering and frightening look at a number of the issues that confront America today. One can’t possibly do justice in a single column to all of the outstanding speakers and panels assembled, but it is available online for viewing, and is well worth watching. Frank Gaffney of the Center for Security Policy was the main organizer and moderator of the event.

I will emphasize that there were four members of the Citizens’ Commission on Benghazi (CCB) who spoke. Among them, the aforementioned Pete Hoekstra, Admiral James “Ace” Lyons (Ret.), former CIA officer Clare Lopez, and former Congressman and Lt. Colonel Allen West (Ret.).

Among the threats discussed were the current conflict with the Islamic State, as well as al Qaeda and jihadists overrunning states such as Libya. Add to this Russian and Chinese aggression, and America’s lack of leadership is becoming painfully apparent.

Admiral James “Ace” Lyons criticized the Obama doctrine, which he said was to “embrace our enemies, undercut our allies, and, under the false premise that U.S. power has been the problem, you then undercut the U.S. military.”

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Navy Secretary’s Speech Illustrates National Security Threats from Obama’s Energy Policies

American Thinker

In a speech Thursday at Arizona State University, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus discussed the relationship between American national and energy security.  Mabus’s remarks highlight, once again, how President Barack Obama is acting contrary to the United States’ national security interests by continuing to delay approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, as well as inhibiting full development of the USA’s oil reserves on federal lands and in the offshore regions.  Acting against the national security interests of the nation runs contrary to the oath of office Obama took, as set forth in Article II, Section I, Clause 8 of the Constitution of the United States, which states:

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Insurgency in America? Former Border Agent Details National Security Threats Spilling Into the U.S.

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Knowledge Creates Power

Former Border Patrol Agent Zachary Taylor told The Blaze just how grave the threat really is.

Taylor broke down the imminent dangers and expanded upon the case that the U.S.-Mexico border has become the soft underbelly of U.S homeland defense.

It’s not just an immigration problem, Taylor insisted, but also a major national security vulnerability.

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