Terrorism and the Missing Southeast Asia Flights

CFP

This article is simply the offspring of observation, and speculation regarding those observations.

The AirAsia flight that recently vanished, without a word, was being flown by Captain Iriyanto, a devout and active Muslim (and his co-pilot was a Muslim-French National).  The pilot of the Malaysian flight that vanished without a word was also a devout Muslim, as was his co-pilot.

airasia

Photo Source: Wodani files

Both were experienced flyers, and experts found it to be conceivable that they could have avoided the tragedies that befell them and the dead passengers under their care.  Experts found it inconceivable that communications simply went dark, and they simply lost touch with the flights and then had to search for the flights for an extended period of time before discovering the fateful ends of the AirAsia flight, and never discovering the wreckage of the Malaysia flight.

Was the disappearance of these flights, and the nose dive of the first flight into the ocean, and the disappearance of the second, just a tragedy, or do they have anything in common with the flights that nose dived into twin towers, a Pennsylvania field, and the Pentagon, on September 11, 2001?  When the first flight hit the World Trade Center we exclaimed, “What an awful accident!”  When the second plane hit, and we saw the images, we exclaimed, “This was done on purpose!”  When the first plane from the Indonesian region vanished under dubious circumstances, we cried out how unfortunate of an accident it was (well, some of us suspected foul play, in defiance to the politically correct narrative being pushed by the media).  Now that there has been a second flight that suddenly vanished, similar in circumstances, and similar in the membership to Islam in regards to the pilots, should we once again say it was a tragic accident?  Or should we come to the same conclusion we came to when the second plane hit the twin towers, and realize it was done on purpose?

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