Business organizations sign letter against Louisville Metro minimum wage hike

Source : globeimages.net

Source : globeimages.net

Free Republic

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) — Several business-related associations stand against a Metro Council proposal to raise the minimum wage.

In a joint statement, they say it “exceeds Council authority” and is “bad policy.”

The statement – sent to media outlets today – was signed by nearly 20 groups including the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, the Kentucky Restaurant Association, and Greater Louisville, Inc.

In it, they say an increase would put local businesses at a competitive disadvantage and lead to job losses.

The proposal would raise the wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour over a three-year period.

Last week, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said he supports raising the wage on the national level, but is concerned a local hike would cause some businesses to relocate and says the issue should be studied further.

Copyright 2014 WDRB News. All rights reserved.

Obama’s Executive Order Raising Minimum Wage For Employees of Federal Contractors Unconstitutional According To Supreme Court…

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Weasel Zippers

As if Obama gives a sh*t what the Supreme Court or Constitution says.

Via NRO:

The president issued an executive order last week purporting to raise the minimum wage for employees of federal contractors to $10.10 an hour. The order is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court made clear in Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co. v. Sawyer that “the President’s power, if any, to issue the [executive] order must stem either from an act of Congress or from the Constitution itself.” Furthermore, “when the president takes measures incompatible with the expressed or implied will of Congress, his power is at its lowest ebb, for then he can rely only upon his own constitutional powers minus any constitutional powers of Congress over the matter.”

Nothing in the Constitution grants the president authority to set or raise the minimum wage independently of an act of Congress. Furthermore, although the president generally has authority to improve the efficient discharge of federal contracts, the president’s minimum-wage order is incompatible with the expressed and implied will of Congress.

Congress has made its will regarding the minimum wage for federal contractors abundantly clear in four separate statutes: The Service Contract Act, the Davis Bacon Act, the Walsh-Healey Act, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under those statutes, the minimum wage for many, if not most, employees of federal contractors is the prevailing minimum wage for employees in the specific job classification in the locality where the work is to be performed. For the remaining classifications of employees for whom no prevailing minimum wage exists, the minimum wage is slotted into the minimum for similar jobs, or is governed by the minimum set by Congress in the Fair Labor Standards Act, i.e., $7.25.

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