Kamala Harris campaign lawyer hired Fusion GPS for Hillary Clinton

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Wasington Examiner

Jerry Dunleavy

 

The former top lawyer for Hillary Clinton’s failed presidential campaign who hired Fusion GPS to carry out controversial opposition research against then-candidate Donald Trump in 2016 is now working for a top 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful.

Marc Elias, who heads Perkins Coie’s political law group, became general counsel for California Sen. Kamala Harris’ presidential bid this year. Elias, who held the same position in Clinton’s campaign, is named in two pending Federal Election Commission complaints and in a recent federal lawsuit alleging that the Clinton campaign broke campaign finance laws when it used Perkins Coie to hire Fusion GPS.

Fusion GPS went on to hire British ex-spy Christopher Steele, who compiled an unverified dossier allegedly based on sources close to the Kremlin which was disseminated to the media and used by the FBI to obtain Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrants targeting former Trump campaign associate Carter Page. Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz is reviewing alleged FISA abuse related to the dossier and Attorney General William Barr launched his “investigation of the investigators” earlier this year. 00:00 00:51

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Clinton’s former presidential campaign manager Robby Mook said in 2017 that he authorized Elias to hire an outside firm to dig up dirt on Trump’s connections with Russia. “I asked our lawyer and I gave him a budget allocation to investigate this, particularly the international aspect,” he said.

Mook said Elias was receiving information from Fusion GPS or directly from Steele himself about the research into Trump and Russia in 2016, and that Elias then periodically briefed the Clinton campaign about the findings.

“We were getting briefings that were put together by the law firm with information,” Mook said. “I’m proud that we were able to assemble some of the research that has brought this to light.”

“I’m just glad that it’s coming out now and I’m glad that there was research there,” Mook said.

Watchdog groups allege that Hillary for America purposely concealed the hiring of Fusion GPS and Christopher Steele by reporting all the payments that it made to Perkins Coie as “legal services” without mentioning opposition research. Perkins Coie was paid over $12 million between 2016 and 2017 for its work representing Clinton and the DNC. According to its co-founder Glenn Simpson, Fusion GPS was in turn paid $50,000 per month from Perkins Coie, and Christopher Steele was paid roughly $168,000 by Fusion GPS for his work.

Perkins Coie admitted in an October 2017 letter that it had hired Fusion GPS, claiming that “Fusion GPS approached Perkins Coie” in March 2016 with the knowledge that Perkins Coie was representing Clinton and the DNC, and that Perkins Coie then “engaged” Fusion GPS from April of that year until just prior to the November election “to perform a variety of research services during the 2016 election cycle.”

Elias himself personally “retained Fusion GPS … to conduct the research” and did so “on behalf of the Clinton campaign and the DNC,” according to a report from the Washington Post.

Brian Fallon, the former national press secretary for the Clinton campaign, previously defended Elias. “Marc is known as one of the most skilled professionals in Democratic politics, in addition to being the party’s top election lawyer,” Fallon said in 2017. “I am damn glad he pursued this on behalf of our campaign and only regret more of this material was not verified in time for the voters to learn it before the election.”

Elias is a fixture in Democratic politics. Aside from working for Harris, Clinton, and the DNC, Elias has said that he and his colleagues at Perkins Coie have represented the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the Democratic Governors Association, various Democratic PACs, the pro-abortion EMILY’s List, dozens of Democratic senators, and more than a hundred Democratic members of the House.

Neither the Harris campaign nor Elias responded to the Washington Examiner’s request for comment.

Reports: Kamala Harris, Questionable Natural-Born Citizen, to Run for President

IS A BIRTH IN THE U.S. ENOUGH?

The Post & Email

by Sharon Rondeau

(Jan. 10, 2019) — Fox News and other sources reported early Thursday morning that Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) plans to announce that she will run for president in 2020.

Harris has failed to answer questions about her parents’ citizenship at the time of her birth in 1964 in Oakland, CA.  Her Wikipedia page says that her mother immigrated from India in 1960 and her father from Jamaica a year later.  If accurate, neither could have resided in the United States for the requisite five years to apply for U.S. citizenship prior to Kamala’s birth.

Harris’s Wikipedia biography additionally states that she grew up in Canada from age 7 through high-school graduation, something she has not publicized on her Senate website.

Harris’s Senate office has not responded to queries from a constituent, Gary Wilmott, who first contacted her in December 2017 regarding her rumored plans to seek the presidency and whether or not her parents ever became U.S. citizens and if so, when.

The Post & Email’s follow-up article dated August 19, 2018 article titled, “Is Kamala Harris Eligible to be President?” continues to go viral on the web.

The Post & Email was unable to reach Harris’s office by phone on at least two occasions and received no response to an email last month asking similar questions about her constitutional eligibility for the Oval Office.

Article II, Section 1, clause 5 of the U.S. Constitution requires that the president be a “natural born Citizen,” which appears to denote a higher level of allegiance than simply “a Citizen of the United States,” the requirement stated in Article I for U.S. representatives and senators as well as respective residency requirements.

The president must also be 35 years old or older and have resided in the United States for at least 14 years.

In 2007, Barack Hussein Obama’s eligibility began to be vigorously questioned given that credible, mainstream reports said he was born in Indonesia or Kenya and that Obama himself claimed a foreign-citizen father who never became a U.S. citizen.  More recent reporting from a former detective who conducted a 5+-year investigation into a “long-form” birth certificate image posted at whitehouse.gov on April 27, 2011 said to be a scan of Obama’s original birth certificate from Hawaii revealed that two U.S. intelligence-community agents have averred that Obama’s foreign birth is “an open secret” in Washington, DC.

Two forensic experts agreed that the birth certificate image could not have originated with a real, paper document, Mike Zullo reported at a final press conference on December 15, 2016 stemming from the investigation spearheaded by former Maricopa County Sheriff Joseph Arpaio.

Sen. Ted Cruz’s presidential eligibility has also been questioned as a result of his birth in Canada to a then-Cuban-citizen father and presumed U.S.-citizen mother.  Cruz has never substantiated even basic U.S. citizenship by releasing a copy of a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), if his parents ever obtained one for him following his birth in Calgary, Alberta on December 22, 1970.

Citizenship information on anyone, including public figures, is not releasable to FOIA requesters, the State Department informed us.  The same holds true for the Canadian government.

The late Sen. John McCain’s eligibility was the focus of scrutiny in both 2000 and again in 2008 when he sought the presidency due to his birth in Panama to U.S.-citizen parents, one of whom was an admiral in the Navy at the time.