The “Too Hard to Do” Syndrome

 

Family Security Matters

On May 25, 1961 President John F. Kennedy stood before Congress and said that before the decade was finished the United States should land a man on the moon and return him to earth.

A year and a half later, in an address at Rice University, known as the “We choose to go to the moon” speech, in front of a large crowd gathered at Rice Stadium in Houston, Texas on September 12, 1962, Kennedy characterized space according to one assessment as “a beckoning frontier” that required an “endeavor within a historical moment of urgency and plausibility” and could be accomplished with a strategy that lived up to America’s “pioneering heritage”.

Then America was being supremely challenged by the Soviet Union. Moscow had put a man into space following the launch of the satellite Sputnik.

America responded with a nation-wide pursuit of space excellence. In 1969, 7 years after President Kennedy challenged us to do so, America’s Apollo 11 landed on the lunar surface and six hours later Neil Armstrong took that one amazing giant “leap for mankind”.

America has lost much of the faith we had that spring day when our astronauts spoke to us from a distance of 240,000 miles. The government does not seem to work anymore. It was a gradual thing but nonetheless it has corroded our character and our spirit.

But while the moon landing buoyed our nation’s confidence, forces had been at work for decades to undermine the very essence of what it means to be an American and what our proper role was in the world.

It started right after World War II.

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