New Documents Reveal Clinton White House Wanted to “Register” All Militia Groups to Watch Them

Conservative Tribune

On Friday, thousands of previously unreleased documents from the Clinton administration were opened to the public.

It should be noted that not only was this a “Friday document dump,” but it was also done on a three-day weekend, which is usually done when documents contain information their authors don’t want the general public to notice.

The Right Scoop has come across a Politico report on some of the information contained in the documents, information pertaining to the militia movement in America and Clinton administration plans to “register” and track the groups.

After the Oklahoma City bombing, members of the Clinton administration floated proposals to force militia groups to register with the federal government, placing themselves under strict regulations, including having their membership lists published and having to obtain federal permission before conducting “paramilitary” training.

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Clinton White House ignored 9/11 warnings

Free Republic

It took 11 years, but Judicial Watch recently received a response to a 2002 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request that revealed another major missed opportunity by the Clinton administration to prevent the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack, which is part of perhaps the most catastrophic failure in the history of U.S. intelligence.

The new document reads like a Robert Ludlum spy novel, replete with exotic locales and sinister plots. Its pages explode with intricate twists and international intrigue. The villains are palpably evil; their plans, pernicious and deadly. But the good guys seemed largely oblivious to their machinations.

The chilling details come from the Defense Intelligence Agency, which finally handed over an intelligence information report titled “Letters Detailing Osama bin Laden and Terrorists’ Plans to Hijack an Aircraft Flying Out of Frankfurt, Germany, in 2000.” The report is dated Sept. 27, 2001.

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtontimes.com