EPA issues 50-state climate warning, flood, drought, ‘insect outbreaks’

OBAMA LIAR LIAR

Washington Examiner

The Environmental Protection Agency Thursday unveiled its new online tool to help local officials deal with climate change, and it warns that no state in the nation is safe from disaster.

The “Climate Change Adaptation Resource Center,” or “ARC-X,” provides a map that break the country into eight regions and every single one comes with a threatening warning and long list of threats to human life.

“From floods and droughts to dangerous heat islands and other public health effects, communities are facing the very real impacts of climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy in unveiling the portal.

While the site isn’t a one-size-fits-all for local officials, it is a blanket warning from the federal government that the United States is on the verge of disaster, even including “human migration” from hot spots.

Here are the warning to each region:

— The Northwest is projected to experience changes in the timing of streamflow that will reduce water supplies for competing demands. Sea level rise, erosion, inundation, risks to infrastructure, and increasing ocean acidity pose major threats. Increasing wildfire, insect outbreaks, and tree diseases are causing widespread tree die-off.

— The Southwest is projected to experience increased heat, drought, insect outbreaks, and wildfires. Declining water supplies, reduced agricultural yields, health impacts in cities due to heat, and flooding and erosion in coastal areas are additional concerns.

— The Great Plains is projected to experience rising temperatures leading to increased demand for water and energy. In parts of the region, this will constrain development, stress natural resources, and increase competition for water. New agricultural practices will be needed to cope with changing conditions.

— The Midwest is projected to experience extreme heat, heavy downpours, and flooding that will affect infrastructure, health, agriculture, forestry, transportation, air and water quality, and more. Climate change will also exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes.

— The Northeast is projected to experience increased precipitation, more frequent and intense storms, and higher average temperatures. These projected changes pose challenges to communities as they protect water and waste infrastructure, maintain water quality, and protect air quality and public health. Many communities are building resilience to the risks they face under current climatic conditions.

— The Southeast region is projected to experience higher average temperatures, increased precipitation, and more frequent and intense storms. These projected changes pose challenges to communities as they diversify water source, protect sensitive wetlands and protect people from heat waves. Climate impacts vary from a wet northern area to a dry southwest area.

— The Hawai’i and Pacific Islands are projected to experience warmer oceans leading to increased coral bleaching and disease outbreaks and changing distribution of tuna fisheries. Freshwater supplies will become more limited on many islands. Coastal flooding and erosion will increase. Mounting threats to food and water security, infrastructure, health, and safety are expected to lead to increasing human migration.

— Alaska has warmed twice as fast as the rest of the nation, bringing widespread impacts. Sea ice is rapidly receding and glaciers are shrinking. Thawing permafrost is leading to more wildfire, and affecting infrastructure and wildlife habitat. Rising ocean temperatures and acidification will alter valuable marine fisheries.

 

H/T Free Republic

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